Handmade farmhouse Christmas tree skirt

Today is going to be fun. Not like I-finished-all-the-laundry type fun but still really fun. A few of my blogger friends have come up with some ideas to make your Christmas a little more farmhousey. Yes, that is now a word; it is an adjective that means your house isn’t a farmhouse, but really REALLY wants to be one. Use it in public and people will think you’re pretty cool.

Let’s travel back in time for a moment together before we continue with the farmhouse nonsense. We will go back to a more simple time–before iphones and blue-ray and even facebook. The dark ages, 1996.

Mr. Creativity were getting married in August and we had the most creative wedding shower. The ladies at our church gave us a holiday shower. We received items for Easter, 4th of July, Valentines Day and of course Christmas. My mom surprised me by making the prettiest tree skirt. It was a red floral skirt that matched our sofa. We have used that tree skirt for all these years and I’ll use it for many years to come. But this year, I wanted to make one that goes with some of my new decorations.

To bring the farmhouse feel to the skirt, I chose to make ragged ruffles with ticking for my fabric. I was buying this fabric and the lady behind the cutting counter remarked at just how ugly it was. I laughed and thought “bless her heart, she doesn’t know any better”. (You know you can say just about anything if you end it with “bless her heart”, Right?)

Handmade farmhouse Christmas tree skirt

Anyway, that is a subject for another post. Back to the tree skirt. First step is to cut a base out of a cheap fabric. I chose felt. It was only &2.99/yard and I had a coupon on top of that. I bought 3 yards which was a little more than I needed, but I was just guessing.

Handmade farmhouse Christmas tree skirt

To make the base, I folded the fabric into a square and used my measuring tape as a compass and drew a 1/4 circle. To decide on the size of the circle, I measured the diameter of the base of the tree (how wide the branches stick out). Divide that number by 2 and then mark your fabric.

Handmade farmhouse Christmas tree skirt

I cut a little off the tip so that the tree could fit up in the middle of circle and then cut one side of the circle open to make it easier to put around the tree.

I bought 2.5 yards of the ticking (again, just guessing at the cutting counter) and I had plenty of fabric. The ticking was cut into 6″ wide strips.

Handmade farmhouse Christmas tree skirt

This made about 25 strips of ticking. 25 strips that needed to be ruffled. Every single strip. Thankfully, I was surprised and it went quickly.

I left the edges raw and only snipped away some of the long strings. This gives it a more primitive look. You could finish all of the edges if you can’t handle strings. But me? I’m totally good with the strings.

Handmade farmhouse Christmas tree skirt

To attach the ruffles, I simply hot glued them onto the felt base. I started with the outside edge and worked my way towards the center of the circle.

Handmade farmhouse Christmas tree skirt

I know there are people out there that think ticking is a ‘utility’ fabric; they are allowed to have their own misguided opinion. I adore ticking. If you look closely to the picture of my full tree you can see that I used some of the leftover fabric to make a ticking banner garland for the tree as well. If I had enough I would probably have made ticking stockings.

You know that will be on my next year’s t0-do list…

Handmade farmhouse Christmas tree skirt

Handmade farmhouse Christmas tree skirt

Handmade farmhouse Christmas tree skirt

Handmade farmhouse Christmas tree skirt

Handmade farmhouse Christmas tree skirt

Handmade farmhouse Christmas tree skirt

Handmade farmhouse Christmas tree skirt

Handmade farmhouse Christmas tree skirt

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